Panelized Home Building is a Snap

panelized_home_building

In the high-tech approach known as panelized construction, pre-engineered wall sections are produced for a new home in factory-controlled conditions, then shipped complete to the building site for final construction.

Unlike stick-built homes, a panelized home is built with factory perfect precision and once the foundation is set, can be weather tight in just a few days. This allows crews to work comfortably as they install all services and finish the home faster with better quality.

1 Acre 2-family Zoned Land in Northern Westchester, NY

Builder/land owner has 1 acre of two-family zoned land in quiet residential neighborhood with full lake rights.

Builder will build a custom home on this lot of approximately 2000 ft2. A multi family dwelling can also be accommodated as this type of zoning is rare in the Town of Cortlandt.

Click here to view custom home plans and models.

All home styles can be customized to meet current architectural community requirements. Featured home plan included in this listing is a suggestion based on similar exterior appearance of adjacent homes. Stone and stucco is a common neighborhood style.

$149,900 Asking price is for land portion only. Sale of property is contingent upon building a custom home. Total price of home and land will be based upon size of home, plan style and details selected by homeowner.

Contact land owner for more information.

Is 2013 the right time to build a panelized home

Modular homes financing concernsHave you noticed it yet? The growing murmur out there, getting louder every week, bubbling up in newspapers, on TV, and on news sites, and it’s telling you … to buy a house in 2013.

OK, maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but there are definitely a lot of experts (and non-experts) suggesting that now is the right time to buy a house — that is, in 2013. And that murmur may soon turn into a deafening roar. So let’s look at the questions you need to ask to determine whether 2013 is really the best time to buy a house.

Is Buying a House Right for You Right Now?

We’ll discuss the numbers in a second, but before we do that it’s important to get one thing straight: No matter what the national economic and housing market trends indicate, it only makes sense to buy a house if it meshes with your current place in life and your future goals.

For example, if you have a stable career and a job that pays enough to cover your living expenses (with some leftover for emergencies/retirement), and in addition you plan on being in the same place for 3-5 years or expect you could rent the house out if you were to move away, then you are probably in a good position to consider buying a house in 2013.

On the other hand, if you can’t imagine giving up your mobility, if you can’t count on having a steady income, or if you have substantial credit card debt or student loan debt (or are struggling to pay your bills each month) then it might not make sense for you to buy a home at this time.

Are Mortgage Rates the Best in 2013?

So let’s say you’ve decided that now is a good time for you personally to buy a house. The next question is whether it’s the right time financially. A big part of the answer has to do with interest rates. Lower interest rates are always better, obviously, because they save you money — even an interest rate that is 1% lower could save you $50,000 or more over the course of a 30-year mortgage.

And if you can lock-in a low rate with a fixed-rate mortgage (rather than an adjustable-rate mortgage) that’s even better.

So the question is, are interest rates low right now? The experts say yes. This graph shows average mortgage interest rates over the past 30 years:

As you can see, rates are currently at about 3.5% which is lower than at any other point in the past three decades. So clearly, it’s true that this is an opportunity to lock in low interest rates. But do we have any reason to expect them to increase in the near future? That’s hard to say. Some experts have been predicting inflation and rising interest rates for the last few years and it hasn’t happened yet. These kinds of predictions are notoriously difficult to get right. However, it’s probably not a bad idea to assume that these rates will increase at some point in the future.

That still doesn’t leave us with a complete picture though, because we haven’t looked at housing prices yet.

Are Home Prices the Best in 2013?

If you’ve been paying any attention to the news for the past five years, then you know about the housing market crash that coincided with (and partly caused) the global financial crisis that began in 2008. But have housing prices rebounded already, or are they still low? It depends on which city and neighborhood you’re talking about, of course, but we can get a sense of the national picture from this graph of the Case-Shiller index:

Case-Shiller graph via Wikipedia (click to enlarge)Case-Shiller graph via Wikipedia (click to enlarge)

The graph is a measure of housing prices adjusted for inflation. As you can see, prices are still much lower than they were at the peak of the housing bubble. That doesn’t mean they couldn’t drop further in the coming years — or that they’ll ever return to their highs of the mid-2000s — but it is an indication that you should be able to get a reasonable price if you decide to purchase in 2013. The really important thing is to pay attention to housing price trends in the area you hope to buy a home (you can use sites like Zillow.com and Trulia.com to track prices for specific houses and neighborhoods). That data will be relevant to your decision more than the national data.

And remember, life contains many surprises, and if we learned one thing during the housing market bubble and crash, it’s that you should not bank on housing prices going up.

Are You Ready for the Work (and Cost) of Buying a House?

If you’re still thinking this is a good year to buy a house, be sure you understand the amount of work it will require and the upfront costs that you’ll need to pay. When you buy a house, it takes a lot of effort to (A) find the house you want, (B) make an offer and negotiate with the seller, and (C) go through the closing process. Even once you have the house, you may have to make repairs on certain items.

You will also need to have enough money to cover the closing costs, and you’ll need to be financially prepared for the regular costs of owning a home, which include property taxes and maintenance expenses.

With that said, 2013 may be the right time for you to buy a home. And if you think through the decision carefully and do the things that are necessary before buying a house, then you are more likely to have a positive experience. Good luck!

[source: http://homes.yahoo.com/news/is-2013-the-right-time-to-buy-a-house–231039614.html]

2 Family Custom Built Home in Westchester, NY

For Sale By Owner

For Sale By Owner

The country-cottage styling of this stately stone home includes multi-level roof, gables, great rooms with hearth, dining room, vaulted ceilings, spacious kitchen and breakfast areas, master suite with tray ceiling, walk-in closets and full second floor mother/daughter apartment.

Builder/home owner has 1 acre of land in quiet residential neighborhood with full lake rights. Looking to sell lot and build a custom home that fits the architectural style of adjacent properties to increase resale and aesthetic value.

Several home styles are being offered and all floor plans and home layout designs are completely customizable to meet buyer accommodation preferences.

bedrooms 4
bathrooms 4
floors 2
year built 2013
lot 1 acre
sqft 3100
garage 2 car
school lakeland
550,000

Geothermal for Panelized Homes a great investment

No longer buy oil, natural gas or propane for heating, cooling and hot water – forever!

Geothermal heat pumps can do all sorts of things—from heating and cooling homes to warming swimming pools. These systems transfer heat by pumping water or a refrigerant (a special type of fluid) through pipes just below the Earth’s surface, where the temperature is a constant 50°F.

During the winter, the water or refrigerant absorbs warmth from the Earth, and the pump brings this heat to the building above. In the summer, the heat pumps run in reverse and help cool buildings.

  1. Water or a refrigerant moves through a loop of pipes.
  2. When the weather is cold, the water or refrigerant heats up as it travels through the part of the loop that’s buried underground.
  3. Once it gets back above ground, the warmed water or refrigerant transfers heat into the home.
  4. The water or refrigerant cools down after its heat is transferred. It is pumped back underground where it heats up once more, starting the process again.
  5. On a hot day, the system can run in reverse. The water or refrigerant cools the building and then is pumped underground where extra heat is transferred to the ground around the pipes.

Geothermal Heating and Cooling helps free America’s dependence on foreign fossil fuel!

In the Northeast, the best types of geothermal energy systems for residential properties are the “DX” (Direct Exchange) and Water Loop Systems. The DX Geothermal technology is newer, more efficient and requires much less energy to run than water based systems.

Once the heat energy is removed from the ground, it is transferred to a small compact geothermal compressor assembly installed in the home. This device operates just like a refrigerator, the most reliable appliance in the home – with an important difference, this one device efficiently supplies all heating, cooling and hot water to the entire home.

Today’s Geothermal Systems can save the average homeowner $5000 to $10,000 and more every year and provides the fastest payback of any renewable energy system. It can also dramatically increasing the value of your real estate and at the same time, making a positive contribution to the environment and help America end dependence on foreign fuel.

For quotes on installing geothermal heating and cooling systems on your new home construction, contact us.